Bullets in surviving planes during WWII. Wild. By @data_iceberg

Bullets in surviving planes during WWII. Wild. By @data_iceberg
Fascinating data story. In WW2, the survival rate of The Allies’ airmen had been as low as 41%. Reducing air battle causalities became a pressing issue. The command came up with a solution to arm their bombers more heavily. In order to find out which parts should be armed with additional armour, the bullets holes of the returned air-planes were assessed. Data showed that damages mainly concentred in three areas: the fuselage, the outer wings and the tail. Placing extra layer of metals on three areas would seem to be the obvious answer. However, Abraham Wald, a statistician, pointed out a critical flaw in the conclusion: the analysis only took samples from returned planes. He explained that if a plane makes it back safely after being shot, it means the bullets didn’t damage the most critical parts. Reinforcement is instead needed on the sections that had few bullet holes, such as the engines and the cockpit, as planes that were hit in those sections probably never made it back. The finding eventually helped to turn the tide of the war. #datavisualization #dataviz #datavisualisation #datascience #data #datastorytelling #statistics #statistician #bias #analysis #statistician #ww2 #wwii #airplane #airforce #bomber #military #ww2history #interestingfact #interestingfacts #story #stories #math #maths #mathematics #mathematician #distribution #engineering #engineers #dataisbeautiful #interesting

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